Author Topic: First Tricks to Buy  (Read 12998 times)

Samantha Crawford

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First Tricks to Buy
« on: October 23, 2012, 01:08:51 PM »
I would really appreciate some help on this.
I am clown and face painter and I've done a few simple magic tricks in my show.

I have been asked to put on a small magic show for a birthday party (kids aged around 8-9). I would like to invest some money on tricks especially suited for kids. Could anyone point out some great routines?

Thanks a lot!

Cliffg37

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Re: First Tricks to Buy
« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2012, 03:08:18 PM »
You are really asking two different questions here.

1) You want magic that is fairly easy to learn or self working... You want magic that will hold an 8 or 9 year old's attention.
2) you want to know about routining, sop one trick leads to another.

I will recommend a couple of tricks to start with.

Hippity Hop rabbits.  You can get a lot of mileage out of this simple prop and while it is not self working, it can be mastered in less than an hour of practice.  Do it early in the show and you will silence the smart-*** kids, as the surprise ending is a jaw dropper and gives them an impossible puzzle to figure out.

Any change bag routine is good for the same reasons as above.  Done right and done well you can make the routine easily last 3 or 4 minutes.  With that age group, I would not recommend any long tricks, or any hard to follow along tricks.

Routining is harder in some ways and easier in others.

Harder... making one trick flow into the next, and finding tricks that naturally lend themselves to a routine can be difficult.
Easier... Don't try the above, use your patter to tell a story that interweaves the tricks together.  All kids love a good story. 

I hope that helps you out.

Samantha Crawford

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Re: First Tricks to Buy
« Reply #2 on: October 24, 2012, 02:06:35 PM »

Harder... making one trick flow into the next, and finding tricks that naturally lend themselves to a routine can be difficult.
Easier... Don't try the above, use your patter to tell a story that interweaves the tricks together.  All kids love a good story. 

Great stuff.

I'm looking into Hippity Hop Rabbits. That seems like a good one. It is kind of expensive but I've seen it recommended so much that I'm going to spring for that for my first "big" trick.

Is any Hippity Hop Rabbit better than the others? Which one should I buy, it seems like a lot of people sell them.

Also, I'm a little unclear on "routines" verses tricks and how to weave them all together.

Any ideas?

Thank you so much for your suggestions. This is GREAT. I like this forum because people are nice and don't jump down your throat if you don't know everything.

Cliffg37

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Re: First Tricks to Buy
« Reply #3 on: October 25, 2012, 03:37:51 PM »
There are two versions of hippity hop that I am aware of.  One is magnetic and one is mechanical. 

I think the mechanical one takes a little more practice, and I have never tried the magnetic. 

My set is about 8 inches tall and it has served me well in a 200 seat theater.  Try "magicauction.com" and see if anyone is selling one used to keep the cost down.

Cliffg37

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Re: First Tricks to Buy
« Reply #4 on: October 25, 2012, 03:48:19 PM »
On routining tricks...
I am not too sure how to advise you on that. I could share a routine of mine with you, but if your style and mine do not match, this will probably not work for you... but you can try it.

I start with a change bag that end up producing an over sized dollar bill, after a few other bits of stuff.  I tell the audience they will hear the story of George Worthington, a con man who is in jail.

I do the rubber band and paper clips on the bill trick as George and the warden (a pink paper clip get away and run off together.


To get away they need transportation and so try to buy a car.  Temple screen produces photos of cars trucks and planes etc.

They buy a pair of the fastest giant rabbits in the world. (hippity hop)

They come to a castle (appearing card castle) but George tries to con the queen and she is going to imprison them.

They get to an airport, but miss the plane. (vanishing airplane on a card) (you could use a coloring book for that with the right photos)

Moral, crime does not pay.

As I said, I don't know how well something like that will or wont work for you.  The first time I did the above bit was for a class of 2nd graders, and it held their attention quite well.  The story was loose enough for them to follow and non of the tricks took too long.